Tag Archives: honda

Tech Highlights: McLaren-Honda front wing and powertrain problems

IMG_1821

If you haven’t already caught some of my tech analysis in the past couple of Motorsport Monday magazines then here’s your first glimpse of some: I dissect McLaren’s new front wing (only on Alonso’s car) and also explain what is going wrong (again) with the MCL32 powertrain – it’s not all Honda’s fault! You can also find some mini-articles on developments from Australia on the Motorsport Week website.

Also, a quick question I would really appreciate some responses to: Would anyone be interested in buying a print of one of my many illustrations? Obviously we don’t all want a framed McLaren front wing but something more like the Mercedes W05 below might take your fancy.

Mercedes W05 review

Leave a comment on your thoughts, please! 🙂

2015 US GP Tech Highlights

In all honesty I didn’t expect to be writing this piece at all, but thankfully the teams provided us this week! Even though we are heading into the latter stages of the season, and despite the distance between Europe – where all of the teams are based – and the US, the developments keep on coming through. Most of the paddock will be looking ahead to 2016 and the upgrades seen in Texas provide a few clues to what we could see next year.

However with no proper dry running (aside from the latter stages of the race, which wasn’t exactly bone dry) it would have been difficult to evaluate the these components, so expect those who brought developments to fully utilise any dry running in Mexico this weekend. Continue reading

2015 Russian GP Tech Highlights

Been crazy busy at university at the moment so unfortunately – whilst I tried to find time to write this exclusively for my blog – I’ve had to copy most of it over from my analysis piece I did for Richland F1. Quick update on YouTube things: very close to getting more videos out… 🙂

The Sochi circuit in Russia is a track of compromise – one of the longest straights on the year kicks the lap off, whilst the high speed S2 and technical final sector make for an aerodynamic headache. This sort of layout shows who has really done their homework and provides us the best chance of seeing the most efficient cars.

With not many more ideal opportunities to introduce new developments to the cars in 2015, Russia saw a number of various upgrades ranging from McLaren’s further revised power unit to an interesting tweak to the Mercedes front wing. Continue reading

2015 Italian GP Tech Highlights

This piece mainly goes through Mercedes’ significant power unit update. It isn’t exclusive blog content – as I was really busy last week and not feeling great this week (brilliant, I know) – but I’m posting my piece from Richland F1 because I don’t think it reached many people anyway. No illustrations unfortunately but with Singapore this weekend I can guarantee that I’ll be back on top form!

Following on from Spa, Monza is the ultimate speed king on the Formula 1 calendar. After catapulting out of the Parabolica, the drivers will reach some 220mph by the end of the main straight. This is achieved by running incredibly skinny wings (both front and rear) and removing as many intricacies as possible in the pursuit for speed.

However, whilst these technical changes are common for the Italian GP, William Tyson also covers the bigger tech news from the weekend – Mercedes and Ferrari’s power unit upgrades. Continue reading

2015 Canadian GP Tech Highlights

My exams are finally over but, because of Le Mans this weekend and other projects, I have had to essentially copy and paste this post from my analysis for Richland F1. It does have added illustrations (which are exclusive to this blog post) and there is quite a lot of extra detail bits, though. Got plenty of things coming which I’m excited about, and hopefully you will be when they are revealed…

Canada is a highly demanding circuit for any car: the track – primarily made up of a series of straights – is interrupted by chicanes and hairpin bends. The cars must be fitted with a low downforce setup to maximise straightline speed without being penalised too much under braking.

Braking stability and power are crucial to a good laptime. There are some big stops – notably into the final chicane following the back straight – which spike brake temperatures, forcing teams to run larger brake ducts and compromise aerodynamic performance.

Montreal creates one of the biggest tradeoffs of the year alongside Spa in terms of sacrificing top speed for cornering ability, which is why many teams bring specific updates for this race. Continue reading

2015 Spanish GP Tech Highlights

Note: This is essentially my analysis piece for Richland F1, with some added bits and pieces, illustrations and details about the fuel flow monitoring changes that were introduced. Exam season is in full swing so apologies for the not-so-exclusive content this week.

Barcelona is pretty much the best playground for an F1 car. Aerodynamics are severely tested with a variety of long, high and medium speed corners spaced out by a series of straights, whilst the final sector is now a good hunting ground for those with strong mechanical grip after the circuit layout changed in 2008.

With such an emphasis on aero, updates are often developed from around the end of the winter testing period specifically for this race and on into the middle of the season. Teams recognise this as an opportunity to jump ahead of their nearest rival but with almost everyone making gains all of the time, eking out that extra tenth of a second from the overall package is all the more crucial. Continue reading

2015 Bahrain GP Tech Highlights

Given that the gap between the Chinese and Bahrain grand prix was just one, tweaks to the cars were minimal and were mainly aimed at cooling as the two circuits share quite similar downforce characteristics.

However more was learnt about McLaren’s Honda power unit plus a few other additions were also visible over the course of the weekend. Continue reading