Tag Archives: exhaust

Analysis: Will 2016 exhausts be louder?

Originally published on Richland F1

On the very first test outing of the current generation V6 turbo hybrid power units back in February 2014, photographers and journalists got their first taste of the sound of the future of F1. Needless to say, the paddock was split. They are far from the screaming naturally aspirated engines of the past but do arguably offer a much deeper and richer blend of tones, albeit at a substantially lower volume.

There have been complaints from a lot of fans about the lack of decibels over the past year and a half, which is why the FIA have decided to take action ahead of the 2016 season. This involves splitting the wastegate and engine exhaust gases into two separate systems.

At the moment, the exhaust gases from the engine (via the turbocharger) and from the wastegate system all exit through a single exit pipe at the back of the car. The single exhaust pipe layout allows the wastegate gases to escape the bodywork cleanly and prevent internal overheating although this does slightly hinder the overall volume of the exhaust tone.

For 2016 the FIA have decided to divide the ICE and wastegate gases into two sets of pipework, whereby the teams must retain the single, large exhaust exit for the former and up to two smaller outlets – straddling either side the central exit – for the latter. The motorsport governing body think that by splitting the two systems the engine sound will be louder than before, although it is actually more likely to change its tone. Regardless of whether it works or not, at least we won’t be seeing the ‘trumpet’ exhaust tested last year!

Another interesting topic that has emerged from the regulation change is whether it will have any aerodynamic benefits. We have witnessed the power of exhaust gases when it comes to generating downforce when Red Bull pioneered the EBD (exhaust blown diffuser), but will we something similar next year? Continue reading

Analysis: Follower Questions – monkey seats, cascades and brake ducts

Over the summer I asked if there was anything that you wanted explaining on the technical side of F1, via my social media outlets. I received a few questions and – now that I have got my new laptop – they shall be duly answered in this blog post. So let’s crack on…

“Ferrari’s front brake ducts seem larger than necessary, even without any blown wheel nuts. What’s your opinion on them?” – Andrea Solimini, via Facebook
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Analysis: 2014 – Power Units

Image copyright Renault Sport F1

Image copyright Renault Sport F1

2014 presents the biggest change to Formula 1 cars since the late 1980s: gone are the naturally aspirated 2.4 litre V8 engines and in their place a 1.6 litre V6 turbo is introduced. To make matters more complex the engine manufacturers must apply complex energy recovery systems to boost power output, reduce fuel consumption and further reduce the number of engines allowed per driver per season to lower costs. The idea behind this is to bring F1 technology more in line with road car development.

The last time turbo power was in F1 was during the 1988 season. Honda dominated this era with McLaren, using a 1.5 litre V6 in the famous MP4/4 before being replaced by a 3.5 litre naturally aspirated engines for the following season. Technology has moved on drastically since then. The 2014 power units have the potential to decide the world championship such is their importance. The manufacturer who meets their side of the bargain will have a huge upper hand on the opposition. They are therefore the most likely component to give the biggest performance factor.

What are Power Units?

The engineers no longer refer to the next generation of F1 powertrain as “engines”. They are now dubbed as “power units”. The reason behind this being that the powertrain is made up of more than just a combustion engine/turbo, there are more complex elements involved from this season onwards. The recovery systems on board will generate enough energy to supply plenty of extra kick via an electric motor, with the additional power output mapped into the engine system to provide more performance at optimal stages of the lap (i.e. the driver will no longer have to push a button to use the additional power available).

Facts & Figures

Let’s get into the numbers, starting with the turbo-charged engine itself.

  • Cylinders: 6
  • Capacity: 1.6 litres
  • Power: 600bhp*
  • Maximum rpm: 15,000
  • Maximum fuel flow rate: 100kg per hour at 12,000-15,000rpm

*Estimated figure. Rumours of some manufacturers extracting a higher power output (notably Mercedes) at this stage of development.

Energy Recovery Systems (ERS):

  • Power output: Additional 161bhp for 33.3 seconds per lap
  • Maximum harvest energy: 2MJ per lap
  • Maximum energy output: 4MJ per lap
  • Battery weight: Limited to 20-25kg (must be placed beneath the fuel cell as a single unit)

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