Category Archives: Other

An update, and a simulation study…

Hello readers. It’s been far too long since I’ve posted on here, so I thought I’d finally share with you what my rough 2018 plans are and show you what I’ve been working on a bit in between exams, job applications, running… I’ve been busy, alright.

What’s happening in 2018 with F1 tech stuff?

I’d like to tell you a bit more about that but for now keep an eye on my Twitter for announcements coming soon (hopefully). But if my plans don’t come to fruition then that doesn’t matter because I’ll be writing on here about it anyway. Not going to lie, the media world frequently frustrates me so I was in two minds as to whether I’d sack it off for at least a year and just go back to my roots, i.e. this blog. However, at the moment we are still on course to cover the technical aspect through other medium(s)…

Car launches are coming up soon and this year should be another exciting one. It will be interesting to see if the teams are beginning to converge on particular designs, or whether we still see diverse solutions to the same problem(s). There has been plenty of hype over whether Mercedes will be forced to adopt a high rake angle philosophy and what they will do with their wheelbase – my guess is that they won’t but they will have found a way to shorten the car length a bit, retaining their good aerodynamic characteristics while overcoming the inconsistent handling issues associated with the long wheelbase, particularly around street circuits.

Tyres could be another talking point this year and it might be difficult to assess how they behave during testing. We have two new compounds, the super-hard and hyper-soft (way to further add complexity to the system…) which will cover Pirelli’s arses for any given circuit regardless of how the new cars perform – they are expected to be a further second faster per lap. The Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya is also undergoing a resurface at the moment to accommodate Moto GP’s requirements, and although the aim is to replicate the surface roughness from the old tarmac there are bound to be discrepancies. Of all years headline times could be worthless altogether given how the track might evolve over the two testing periods. And, as always, it’s pretty cold in Spain this time of year which makes life harder for the engineers.

What am I not looking forward to this season? The Halo of course. I understand that it’s necessary but come on, even IndyCar look set to have a more attractive solution! We are stuck with it for now it would seem. This leads me nicely onto something I’ve been playing with over the Christmas/New Year period.

Halo simulation study

Around Christmas time the general public were given further details on the load cases the Halo has to withstand. The teams, of course, have known these for a while, as they have had to figure out how to design and construct their monocoque to cope with the extra stresses bearing down from the roll hoop structure.

I wondered where the peak stresses would occur on the chassis, how the teams would go about addressing the problem and what the weight penalty for such changes would be. Including the mounting brackets, nuts, bolts, pins etc., there is an extra 10 kg of weight sat high up on the car, plus further weight from the strengthening of the chassis.

My plan was to create a fully dimensioned Halo in SolidWorks (must take advantage of the final year I have it for free!), simulate the different load scenarios on it to see if the model worked, and then install it onto a mock-up chassis of my own to see the load distribution.

I started out by drawing the Halo on paper, using the FIA cockpit template dimensions as a reference. In fairness it was going pretty well, although when I did manage to get hold of an official technical drawing it made my life a bit easier and it added further accuracy to my study. I decided to create three components in SolidWorks: the central strut, the roll hoop and the ‘feet’ in which the hoop would slot into either side of the driver’s head.

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I’m fairly good with CAD, but I was genuinely surprised by how difficult the Halo was to construct. I was having to create quite a few planes for lofted extrusions, mounting the roll hoop at an angle and aligning the whole thing to the FIA’s guidelines. During my university studies last year I designed a planetary gearbox for a wind turbine and that was actually a lot less frustrating! The finished product is below.

Halo1

The next job was to set up the simulation. I defined the material (I started with stainless steel but in the real world it is titanium wrapped in carbon cloth) fixed the two feet, put a roller/slider fixture on the pin join and placed a 1 kN load on the strut. This is nothing compared to what it has to withstand (46 kN) but it was a start, just to check everything would run correctly.

Now, with hindsight, I was probably biting off a little more than I could chew (or at the very least my laptop was). Simulating assemblies isn’t SolidWorks’s favourite task, and it refused to run properly despite fiddling with contact sets: I formed the centre strut in anticipation of mating it with the roll hoop, but this seemed to cause problems and the simulation would often ignore the hoop as if it wasn’t there and just direct the load through the strut alone…

As you can see below I set the two as ‘bonded’ eventually but after doing so the simulation refused to run after about three minutes.

Halo2

I also tried making the strut and roll hoop one part. I am yet to run it yet but hopefully I will make some progress there. If you’ve got any suggestions as to how to set the simulation up let me know (leave a comment, tweet me, email me) as I’d like to continue with this during some of my spare time. If I can get this to work then I’ll be able to build a monocoque and further my investigation, although I don’t see my laptop fancying that to be honest.

 

So, that’s what’s been happening lately. Looking forward to covering 2018 for you and I’ll try to keep this place a bit more up to date…

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Why Technical Reliability Holds Key to 2017 Formula One Championship

By Ben Woods

The 2017 Formula One season promises to deliver one of the closest races in the battle for the Constructors’ Championship in the last five years.

The dominance of Mercedes in recent history has seen the title become a one-sided affair, with the team winning the crown for the past three seasons on the bounce. However, the rise of Ferrari this term has provided competition at the top, with Sebastian Vettel challenging Lewis Hamilton in the Drivers’ Championship.

Due to the performances of the German and team-mate Kimi Raikkonen, the Italian outfit have pressed Mercedes at the top of the Constructors’ Championship, and are now down to 10/3 in the F1 betting to secure the crown this season, which may represent good value when used in conjunction with bookmakers’ £50 free bet offers. The quality of the teams and drivers involved will ensure that the battle will go down to the wire.

Perhaps the most important aspect of the race for both awards will be the reliability of the vehicles, which has already played a significant role thus far. Continue reading

Could Technology Put Amputees Behind The Wheel Of Formula 1 Cars?

By Jason Cullen

What does it take for an amputee to drive a racing car? Three things: technology, innovation and bravery.

You may have seen the story of Billy Monger – a teenage racing driver who had to have both legs amputated after a horrific high-speed crash – getting back into the cockpit of a racing car.

Billy Monger

This heroic feat is nothing short of inspirational. A true testament to internal fortitude and the human spirit, to get back out there after such an extreme accident in Formula 4 and race again.

His and Team BRIT’s (short for British Racing Injured Troops) aspirations to become the first all-disabled team to race in the iconic Le Mans 24 hours event will be nothing short of spectacular when it happens.

However, it takes more than just the human spirit. It also requires a lot of technological and engineering innovation to get to the point of getting an amputee up to this racing pace. And with that, two questions come to mind:

  • What is this technology?
  • Could the technology put amputees behind the wheel of Formula 1 cars?

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Announcements 8…

Why do I bother numbering my announcements? Anyway…

Quick update on what’s happening on theWPTformula blog for what hopes to be an exciting year of motorsport, particularly F1. Alongside my studies I am pleased to say that I’m currently writing for Motorsport Week and with that I will sometimes feature in their partner eMagazine, Motorsport Monday. In fact, you can already find something of mine in this week’s issue, here. It’s a triple-page guide to the 2017 regulations (preview below) and it’s free to read.

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Why working in F1 is not my dream job…

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MOTORSPORT – CORPORATE 2010 – RENAULT F1 – PRISES DE VUES – VIRY (FRA) – 28/09/2010 – PHOTO : FREDERIC LE FLOC H / DPPI

If you came up to me a couple of years ago and asked where I wanted to be working in the future there was only one answer: a design engineer in Formula 1. I wanted to graduate from university, dive straight into the design office of an F1 team and get stuck in – the idea of climbing the ladder and reaching the top ranks of a top team such as Ferrari or McLaren was exciting, even if I knew the dream would take years to achieve.

I admire those who are already at the top of the engineering pyramid in the sport. Adrian Newey, Paddy Lowe, James Allison and Ross Brawn to name a few who have cut it at the top of the pinnacle of motorsport. I wanted to replicate their success and have a profound impact on F1 and motor racing in general. You could argue that I, or anyone else who has the same ambition and drive, can still do exactly that. However I have been slowly taking backwards steps to see the bigger picture and I am realising that perhaps this is not possible in the way the engineers above have achieved.

Hundreds of people make up F1 teams in this era. Take Mercedes as an example: Over 500 people work on the power units alone, plus a further 500 on the chassis. Rewind 30 years ago and this number was perhaps 50, budget depending. This naturally means that anyone walking into the sport now will have a tougher time making a name for themselves than they would have done previously. Yes, F1 is a team sport, but who doesn’t want to be at the heart of it, driving development forward and leading a team into the history books? Continue reading

Silverstone Single Seater Driving Experience

RK7_1360

Not a tech related post but I thought I’d share this with you.

As some of you may know, my parents gave me a single seater driving experience at Silverstone for my 18th birthday, all the way back in 2013! Unfortunately – thanks to the miserable British weather about 90% of the time – it took me three attempts to complete the damn thing: the previous two occasions had been called off due to excessive rainfall and poor visibility. Continue reading