Category Archives: General

Analysis of the key components of an F1 car.

Analysis: 2015 predictions

2015 is just around the corner and, for the second year running, I have drawn up some predictions as to what we could see next season. The new nose regulations will make a noticeable difference to the appearance of the cars next year – gone are the ‘finger’ (or ‘anteater’ or whatever you want to call them!) appendages and in their place will be designs similar to that on the Mercedes/Ferrari or Williams, depending on how the engineers interpret the rules.

2015 side & plan

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Analysis: Sebastian Vettel’s 2014 issues explained

Sebastian Vettel has had his worst Formula 1 season to date, comprehensively beaten by his younger teammate and generally never getting to grips with the Red Bull RB10. A lot has been said as to why this is the case, so I decided to throw my thoughts up on Richland F1 from a technical perspective.

I don’t talk about the mind games or the internal politics in this piece: this is 100% looking at the potential reasons behind Vettel’s poor performances from a driver/car relationship perspective. It’s already had quite a few comments left by readers at the bottom and I’d love to see some more. Read it here – http://richlandf1.com/?p=31939

Apologies for the lack of posts up on here. I am primarily concentrating on the Mercedes W05 eBook (which is coming very, very soon by the way) and also revising for January exams!

I hope to get a post or two up before the end of the year, hopefully something on why some drivers are more sensitive to rear brake locking under the new regulations plus my 2015 prediction drawing.

A short message: thank you so much for reading this blog. I’ve had an amazing year and my following only continues to grow. I couldn’t really have imagined how far I would get with this blog and I hope this is just the start of something bigger. I always want to improve my content and I’ve got some ideas lined up for 2015 which you might enjoy. 

Merry Christmas and a happy New Year!

Analysis: The success behind the Mercedes W05 Hybrid

Mercedes W05 review

 

Whilst a more in-depth summary of the Mercedes W05 will be available in mine and @SomersF1‘s eBook series (see here for more details), I have written a summary piece for Richland F1 that covers the fundamental reasons behind its dominance. It includes a few drawings (one of which is the unique power unit layout), plus how the W05 compares to other dominant cars in F1 history – http://richlandf1.com/?p=30920

The above illustration was an absolute pain to do but I’m very satisfied with it! Hope you guys like it.

Analysis: Red Bull upper flap flexing

Not for the first time in their short F1 history, Red Bull have caused controversy regarding flexible bodywork around the front wing area. In Abu Dhabi both RB10s were excluded from qualifying after the FIA discovered that the upper flap on the front wing was flexing far too much, induced by an illegal device that is believed to be in the form of a leaf spring.

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Analysis: 2015 nose changes

As we all know, the noses caused quite a stir at the beginning of this year although, like the stepped noses of 2012, we have steadily become used to the ‘interesting’ solutions across the grid. Many fans – including myself – didn’t like this year’s noses (barring Mercedes, which I personally think looks great) although it was good to see varying approaches to the regulations rather than a generic design.

To prevent some of the aesthetically displeasing designs returning for 2015 the FIA have re-written article 15.4.3 in the technical regulations, supplying a new set of guidelines for the teams to create their front crash structure.

In this blog post we shall dissect the new regulations and consider design options for 2015.
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Analysis: Follower Questions – monkey seats, cascades and brake ducts

Over the summer I asked if there was anything that you wanted explaining on the technical side of F1, via my social media outlets. I received a few questions and – now that I have got my new laptop – they shall be duly answered in this blog post. So let’s crack on…

“Ferrari’s front brake ducts seem larger than necessary, even without any blown wheel nuts. What’s your opinion on them?” – Andrea Solimini, via Facebook
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Analysis: Pitstops – How are they so quick?

This post was requested by email. Unfortunately I managed to delete the email so I can’t mention who asked for it! Apologies, but here it is for you…

At the US grand prix last year Red Bull performed a pitstop in 1.923 seconds, the fastest in F1 history. OK, that isn’t strictly true because as much as they like to brag about it, the car was stationary for 1.923 seconds. The actual pitstop time is recorded from the moment the car enters the pitbox to when it leaves the pitbox. FOM place timing gates at these points and this is the time we see on our screens. So really, considering a driver’s reaction time to the green light is about 0.2 seconds and it takes a couple more tenths to get in and out of the pitbox, you’re probably looking at an overall time of 2.2-2.3 seconds. Impressive.

Red Bull – and all of the top teams at least – can measure the stationary time of their car using cameras placed on the boom(s) of the pitbox, hence why they were able to proudly announce their ‘world record’. Continue reading